Welcome to Southwest Firearms
Join our community, sign up for free today!
Sign Up

SHTF scenario what do you have in your truck or car to make it home to loved one's.

Messages
162
Reactions
182
The get-home bag, packed with food, etc. A tarp or two. Parachute cord. Knives, hatchet. Assorted medicines. A couple of armored Life-straws. Lighters and cooking/eating utensils. Road flares (easy to make fires with them, even in the rain.) Soap & toiletries. A bunch of coin tissues. Flashlight & batteries. A hand-crank radio.


View attachment 4014
So what's the deal with the PVC? does that act as a pre-filter or is it just a carrying case? Is the life straw that fragile? Have you tried the Sawyer products?
 
Messages
21
Reactions
48
So what's the deal with the PVC? does that act as a pre-filter or is it just a carrying case? Is the life straw that fragile? Have you tried the Sawyer products?
I haven’t seen the Sawyer products, but will have a look.

The pipe is just for storage and protection of the filter when it’s not being used. The Lifestraw seems like something that could get crushed, so I armored it with the pipe. Once it’s been used, it’ll need air circulation to dry out - so I drilled holes in the pipe.

I plan to get another water filter that doesn’t rely on someone sucking water through it, since we might be several days away from home when we pull this stuff out of the trunk and start walking. That would mean we’d be cooking meals along the way, and I’d rather not be brewing coffee with water I had to spit into the cook pot.

We have a gravity-fed Lifestraw stored away, here at home. But it’s a bit bulky. Do you have a recommendation for a gravity-fed or pump-action filter that isn’t too bulky?
 
Messages
287
Reactions
608
Simple, lets toss ideas and help each other out. Depending on where you live in this great country there is always a threat to our way of life and things that can make the crazies go crazy!

What event are you trying to be ready for?
What do you have in your vehicle to get you home to loved ones?
What if your vehicle doesn't run or the roads are gone?
Can you communicate with loved ones?
Are you fit enough to make it home?

These are just some of the things to think about. Let me know your thoughts and what you are going to do.
First, I live in Arizona. It’s important to prep for your region. Second, I’m coming home hopefully initially to an empty house. My place is the rally point for my family, (kids, grandkids) of which most live in Phoenix. We have other family that live in 2 other locations which are also options for us.

What event are you trying to be ready for?
A: Any event that disrupts society, either regional, national, or global.
Doesn't really matter what it is, once that thin veil of society is pierced, everything will start to look like a sack of smashed azzholes in a hurry.

What do you have in your vehicle to get you home to loved ones?
A: Specifically, a 3 Day BOB. Fully stocked, food and water items rotated through, usually during hunting trips. Water is pretty important in my region, but I only have 3 gallons. If it’s summer, I either find water along the way, get home before 3 days, or risk perishing. Aside from that, I also have a full set of tools, small parts and supplies specifically for that vehicle, stored in that vehicle, as well as pioneer tools, winch, etc. (Both my POV’s are 4WD) Also, I fill up at half a tank, and when the vehicles sit, i they sit with a full tank. Both are regularly maintained, in excellent condition, and otherwise ready to go.
All this is for the 2 vehicles I own. The company vehicle just has its own dedicated BOB. If I can’t make it home in 3 days or less on my normal commute to/from work, something is dreadfully wrong, and likely water may not be my first priority...

What if your vehicle doesn't run or the roads are gone?

A: I’m assuming I can’t fix what’s wrong with it by your question, and the roads might not be “gone” in my area, but might be blocked, most likely by disabled vehicles, or accident.
There isn’t a road or trail unknown to me in my AO. I’ve lived here my whole life, been an avid hunter and 4 wheeler in that time. There will be a way, one way or another.
If I’m in the company vehicle, my situation is worse. I don’t doubt I could make it, but the words “dicey” and “stressful” come immediately to mind...

Can you communicate with loved ones?
A: Only method of communication with loved ones in your scenario would be cell phone, so let’s hope that works. If it doesn’t, it’s a disadvantage, but not a deal breaker. We all know we’re on the hook to get here, and have a plan. We’re all pretty resourceful, and will have to rely on ourselves or the help of others if the unforeseen happens.
Once here, that all changes. CB’s and FRS.

Are you fit enough to make it home?
A: Really depends on what’s going on around me, what time of year it is, etc. if I’m fighting the whole way, probably not. If I just have to walk, maintain alertness, etc, yeah. I’ll be 56 in a couple months, I’m not the badazz I used to be, but I’m not to be trifled with, either.

Additionally, I think anyone who has a place to be in a time like that, should also consider a second place to be. We actually have 2 other places to be, and a rudimentary plan to get there should the need arise. Both places have other family members with strong community ties, just like I have here, and if the situation is better in either place, a decision can be made to either weather the storm, or pack up and relocate. Not much will be left behind from a prepping standpoint if that’s the case, but there will be personal belongings nonessential that will be left.

The real work begins after getting home.
 
OP
11Charlie

11Charlie

Messages
1,295
Reactions
1,888
First, I live in Arizona. It’s important to prep for your region. Second, I’m coming home hopefully initially to an empty house. My place is the rally point for my family, (kids, grandkids) of which most live in Phoenix. We have other family that live in 2 other locations which are also options for us.

What event are you trying to be ready for?
A: Any event that disrupts society, either regional, national, or global.
Doesn't really matter what it is, once that thin veil of society is pierced, everything will start to look like a sack of smashed azzholes in a hurry.

What do you have in your vehicle to get you home to loved ones?
A: Specifically, a 3 Day BOB. Fully stocked, food and water items rotated through, usually during hunting trips. Water is pretty important in my region, but I only have 3 gallons. If it’s summer, I either find water along the way, get home before 3 days, or risk perishing. Aside from that, I also have a full set of tools, small parts and supplies specifically for that vehicle, stored in that vehicle, as well as pioneer tools, winch, etc. (Both my POV’s are 4WD) Also, I fill up at half a tank, and when the vehicles sit, i they sit with a full tank. Both are regularly maintained, in excellent condition, and otherwise ready to go.
All this is for the 2 vehicles I own. The company vehicle just has its own dedicated BOB. If I can’t make it home in 3 days or less on my normal commute to/from work, something is dreadfully wrong, and likely water may not be my first priority...

What if your vehicle doesn't run or the roads are gone?

A: I’m assuming I can’t fix what’s wrong with it by your question, and the roads might not be “gone” in my area, but might be blocked, most likely by disabled vehicles, or accident.
There isn’t a road or trail unknown to me in my AO. I’ve lived here my whole life, been an avid hunter and 4 wheeler in that time. There will be a way, one way or another.
If I’m in the company vehicle, my situation is worse. I don’t doubt I could make it, but the words “dicey” and “stressful” come immediately to mind...

Can you communicate with loved ones?
A: Only method of communication with loved ones in your scenario would be cell phone, so let’s hope that works. If it doesn’t, it’s a disadvantage, but not a deal breaker. We all know we’re on the hook to get here, and have a plan. We’re all pretty resourceful, and will have to rely on ourselves or the help of others if the unforeseen happens.
Once here, that all changes. CB’s and FRS.

Are you fit enough to make it home?
A: Really depends on what’s going on around me, what time of year it is, etc. if I’m fighting the whole way, probably not. If I just have to walk, maintain alertness, etc, yeah. I’ll be 56 in a couple months, I’m not the badazz I used to be, but I’m not to be trifled with, either.

Additionally, I think anyone who has a place to be in a time like that, should also consider a second place to be. We actually have 2 other places to be, and a rudimentary plan to get there should the need arise. Both places have other family members with strong community ties, just like I have here, and if the situation is better in either place, a decision can be made to either weather the storm, or pack up and relocate. Not much will be left behind from a prepping standpoint if that’s the case, but there will be personal belongings nonessential that will be left.

The real work begins after getting home.
:s0101: Thank you that was amazingly thought out. Yes every region has its own battles. For you it could be the heat. As for the event for me and us on the west coast it would be an earth quake. For you guys I'm honestly not sure but I want to think that I am as prepared as mush as I can be. Thank you for sharing your thoughts.
 
Messages
162
Reactions
182
I haven’t seen the Sawyer products, but will have a look.

The pipe is just for storage and protection of the filter when it’s not being used. The Lifestraw seems like something that could get crushed, so I armored it with the pipe. Once it’s been used, it’ll need air circulation to dry out - so I drilled holes in the pipe.

I plan to get another water filter that doesn’t rely on someone sucking water through it, since we might be several days away from home when we pull this stuff out of the trunk and start walking. That would mean we’d be cooking meals along the way, and I’d rather not be brewing coffee with water I had to spit into the cook pot.

We have a gravity-fed Lifestraw stored away, here at home. But it’s a bit bulky. Do you have a recommendation for a gravity-fed or pump-action filter that isn’t too bulky?
I'm running a Sawyer Mini (A lot of people recommend the Sawyer Squeeze I'm thinking about switching) with a Platypus zip as a dirty water bag, that connects via tube and adapters to my camelbak. The Platypus is pretty rugged so if you can't run it as a gravity bag, you can also sit on it to force water through the filter. I have done this on numerous occasions.
 
Messages
498
Reactions
941
I haven’t seen the Sawyer products, but will have a look.

The pipe is just for storage and protection of the filter when it’s not being used. The Lifestraw seems like something that could get crushed, so I armored it with the pipe. Once it’s been used, it’ll need air circulation to dry out - so I drilled holes in the pipe.

I plan to get another water filter that doesn’t rely on someone sucking water through it, since we might be several days away from home when we pull this stuff out of the trunk and start walking. That would mean we’d be cooking meals along the way, and I’d rather not be brewing coffee with water I had to spit into the cook pot.

We have a gravity-fed Lifestraw stored away, here at home. But it’s a bit bulky. Do you have a recommendation for a gravity-fed or pump-action filter that isn’t too bulky?
I always recomend the MSR line of water filtration systems, they are easy to use, very well made, amd serviceable. They are also very strong and made for a lot of serious use! There is None better at any price! I recomend all this companies products, having used them for real for a very long time, you cannot go wrong!
 
Messages
21
Reactions
48
I always recomend the MSR line of water filtration systems, they are easy to use, very well made, amd serviceable. They are also very strong and made for a lot of serious use! There is None better at any price! I recomend all this companies products, having used them for real for a very long time, you cannot go wrong!
Thanks.
 
Messages
498
Reactions
941
This is the one I use, the MSR MiniWorks EX! High volume filtration and works with the Nalgene bottles, super easy! Rated for over 3500 gallons of filter life, and the filter can be cleaned and serviced or replaced!
Add a CamelBac 3 liter Insulated bladder and your set!
4886
 
Messages
498
Reactions
941
Some more gear I swear by!
MSR Whisperlite international, Uses any fuel you are likely to find! and One bottle of "White Gas" usually lasts me a month of two to 3 times a day cooking! ( Boiling Water) or emergency use!
4889


JetBoil 2 Quart combo pot with Cofveve press!
4888

1563168590448.png
 
Messages
162
Reactions
182
IIRC the Sawyer is rated for 100,000gal/water. And costs $20. I've had some issues with the smaller unit clogging/not passing enough water. I'm personally not willing to spend more than about $40 for a disposable filter. The MSR sweetwater and MiniWorks filters are awesome, but they're a bit bulky by today's standards. Personally I like having a modular filter set, so you've got some kind of bulk filter, a membrane filter, and then an activated charcoal filter. Each unit being replaceable on it's own. I don't know if there's any systems out there like that, but it's kinda what I run, VW fuel filter, the Sawyer, and then an inline charcoal filter.
 
Messages
241
Reactions
141
Not living in AZ I always wonder how different it is to grow food in the dust and heat than it is for us in our region.
It's not that hard. Things like tomato and sun sensitive plants need shade and a mist or green house. Or you can look for heat tolerant hybrids. I've grown tomato, onion, bell pepper, squash, peas, corn ect. plenty of herbs like cilantro and mint. You have to look into where the plants grow the best and try to replicate the climate. Most of my plants have been planted straight into the dust ground. Alot of the loose dirt/dust needs a boost in nutrients a fertilizer or hone brew mulch will do wonders. I used to grow and slaughter my own meat too... cows, pigs, chickens and buffalo. All shot, hoisted, gutted skinned, and chopped on 5 acres of dusty cactus riddled dirt lol
 
Messages
241
Reactions
141
Sorry but that was funny!! Thanks for the heads up I know that I will be changing some things once we move and would like to get a head start on this process if I can.
We always would throw them food. Wait until they start eating. Then calmly but quickly load the rifle and do a point blank shot to the forehead so they don't suffer and they are just worried about the food. We would then open the corral up. Slowly drag it to the hoist. Run a knife along one of the rear ankles for the meat hook to go into. Crank her up, cut the throat. Let it drain into the dusty dirt. Cut the stomach open carefully so you don't puncture the bowel. Cut the throat and anus so the innards will fall free. A cow's innards are upwards of 300 pounds to be prepared for that. Figure out how your going to move that nasty pile of innards. At this point you can either lower it down onto the ground or keep it hoisted. Whichever is easier for you. Your going to need sharp skinning knives. Run the blade between the skin and meat in the fat layer. Once the skin is off your going to need a band saw. Chop her up to your liking and make sure you share with your family. Also BE AWARE that there is a little sack in the innards that absorbs toxins out of the ingested food that the animal has eaten. It's highly poisonous and will kill you if you puncture it onto the meat. I would recommend looking into that before your first slaughter.
 
Messages
241
Reactions
141
It also takes about 5 to 6 hours for 3 guys to finish a cow so make sure you have proper lighting if at night or enough day time to do it. It's no easy task but it's worth it. The meat from a home grown animal tastes alot better then from the store. A buffalo was closer to 9 hours for 3 people. Please plan accordingly and don't waste the meat! ;)
 

UPCOMING EVENTS

Crossroads of the West Gun Show
Dixie Center
1835 S Convention Center Dr, St. George, UT 84790, USA
Crossroads of the West Gun Show
Arizona State Fairgrounds
1826 W McDowell Rd, Phoenix, AZ 85007, USA
Crossroads of the West Gun Show
Pima County Fair
11300 S Houghton Rd, Tucson, AZ 85747, USA

NEW CLASSIFIED ADS

LATEST REVIEWS

  • Murphy's Guns and Gunsmithing
    5.00 star(s)
    When I go in I usually will watch and listen to employees before I choose which one to talk to...
    • Gunsandgars
  • Murphy's Guns and Gunsmithing
    4.00 star(s)
    I have purchased new and used from them. I was lucky a while back and they had a Armalite AR10A...
    • Belevolk
  • Bruno Shooter Supply
    5.00 star(s)
    Not really a gun store per se, although they do have a couple rifles there for sale, but Bruno...
    • wildcat455
  • Ammo AZ
    5.00 star(s)
    Great place,awesome staff and customer service. Have personally done business with them numerous...
    • Tecj68
  • AJI Sporting Goods
    5.00 star(s)
    I have purchased a couple of firearms from AJI. They have a good balance of tactical and other...
    • 1971Chevelle