Welcome to Southwest Firearms
Join our community, sign up for free today!
Sign Up

I’ve found a monster of a rifle

Messages
33
Reactions
20
So my grandpa let me take his 300 jarret prescion predator out for a day of fun. Now this rifle is one of the best rifles I have ever fired. It is a 8mm Remington case necked down to a .30 cal projectile. But I was able to be on paper at 800 yards with just two shots. An amazing rifle just to say the least. I’m curious has anyone else had the privilege to fire such a great rifle?
 
Messages
566
Reactions
295
So my grandpa let me take his 300 jarret prescion predator out for a day of fun. Now this rifle is one of the best rifles I have ever fired. It is a 8mm Remington case necked down to a .30 cal projectile. But I was able to be on paper at 800 yards with just two shots. An amazing rifle just to say the least. I’m curious has anyone else had the privilege to fire such a great rifle?
Damn, that's a $5k gun!
 
OP
Glockenstien
Messages
33
Reactions
20
Evan more impressive is it takes 82 grains of H4831sc to push a .30 cal 165gn projectile pretty far. Cold bore, i hit a 2' x 2' target at 1300 yards.
 
Messages
726
Reactions
552
Even more impressive is that it takes 82 grains of H4831SC to push a .30-caliber, 165-grain projectile pretty far.
Have you ever measured the muzzle velocity for this load? What did you discover if you have done so? I use 68.0 grains of H4831SC to propel a 180-grain Sierra MatchKing to 3000 fps in my .300 Nevada Desert Magnum mildcat with its 27-inch barrel. You're consuming more powder and using a bullet of lesser mass, so you've got to be exceeding what I'm getting. Question is, by how much?

300NDM-solo.JPG
 
OP
Glockenstien
Messages
33
Reactions
20
i have some more loaded up i just havent had the time to chrono it yet and i want to take the new Ar i just got done building and chrono some .223 to see if use military brass has any effect on the accuracy of the round. Or if useing a diffrent primer would make any diffrenceas well.
 
Messages
726
Reactions
552
When I chronoed it, it was around 3126 fps. 82 grains is the minimum load for the 300 Jarret.
3126 fps ÷ 82.0 grains = 38.1 fps per grain of powder. My rifle yields 3000 fps ÷ 68.0 grains = 44.1 fps per grain of powder. My cartridge is 15.75% more efficient in its use of powder than is yours, if muzzle velocity is where we stop. Going further your bullet will get to the target faster, but my design will load more rounds per pound. Yours will load 85.4 rounds per pound; mine will load 102.9 rounds per pound, which is a 20.5% improved utilization of powder at, let us say, $28 per pound. Yours consumes 32.8 cents of powder per round; mine consumes 27.2 cents of powder per round. The greater mass of powder employed in your round returns more recoil. I'm not a rabid fan of recoil; hurts and causes flinching after a period of time. My rifle weighs nineteen pounds, which returns a recoil not unlike that of a common rifle chambered in .243 Winchester. Less physical punishment makes for a more enjoyable afternoon at the range, and can result in tighter groups.

So what do all the numbers mean? Not much if you enjoy what you're shooting. I am one who dissects things like the above down to the ridiculous, just because I am curious about many things mathematical and I am somewhat of a "student" of the shooting sports. I'd love to get down to Vegas where you shoot and stretch the legs of my rifle, just to see what it (and I) can do at such long ranges. We have many places up north, here, but there is always the risk of some punk coming along on a motorcycle and stealing the target, trashing the target or moronically occupying the line of fire just to make trouble for us with the rifles. These kids today know nothing of respect for others. I was taught respect for others at home and during my grade school years in the 1960s. Sadly, the teaching of "self-esteem" has replaced the teaching of respect for others, of responsibility for your own actions and of the ability to discern right from wrong...
 
Messages
726
Reactions
552
. . . chrono some .223 to see if using military brass has any effect on the accuracy of the round. Or if using a different primer would make any difference as well.
Military brass is heavier in its construction so as to reduce the possibility of case failures while the good guys are engaging the bad guys. The heavier construction results in a lesser case capacity than is found in commercial brass. Military 5.56mm NATO ammo is loaded to right around 3250 fps which in my limited experience, is greater than commercially-loaded .223 Remington ammo. I handload all my ammo save for .22LR, to include .223-type ammo. I really don't seek to wring the very last foot-per-second out of the load. A bullet leaving the muzzle at 2875 fps will punch just as nice a hole in the target as will a bullet egressing at 3250 fps. The difference in flight times is minimal for my purposes. I have yet to witness the coriolis effect influence my bullets across just 200 or 300 yards.

Differences in primers from one manufacturer to another can influence your combustion pressures and group sizes, as well as can primers by the same manufacture but from different production lots. The loaded cartridge is a system, of sorts. If one component of the system is changed, the predictability of the result is changed. This is why precision shooters buy 1000-count boxes of primers or even 5000-count cases of same, 500-count or even 1000-count lots of bullets, several eight-pound jugs of powder from the same lot and weight-sort their brass if they cannot get same-lot brass from makers like Norma, Lapua or any of the other high-end brass companies. It's all about consistency of components in an effort to produce consistency of results on the target. I have read that the seating depth of the bullet into the case is a major influencer of accuracy. Never done any empirical testing myself, so I cannot speak to the subject one way or another. The seating depth influences combustion pressure which effects accuracy, so maybe the books are telling us the truth about this kind of thing...
 
Last edited:
OP
Glockenstien
Messages
33
Reactions
20
3126 fps ÷ 82.0 grains = 38.1 fps per grain of powder. My rifle yields 3000 fps ÷ 68.0 grains = 44.1 fps per grain of powder. My cartridge is 15.75% more efficient in its use of powder than is yours, if muzzle velocity is where we stop. Going further your bullet will get to the target faster, but my design will load more rounds per pound. Yours will load 85.4 rounds per pound; mine will load 102.9 rounds per pound, which is a 20.5% improved utilization of powder at, let us say, $28 per pound. Yours consumes 32.8 cents of powder per round; mine consumes 27.2 cents of powder per round. The greater mass of powder employed in your round returns more recoil. I'm not a rabid fan of recoil; hurts and causes flinching after a period of time. My rifle weighs nineteen pounds, which returns a recoil not unlike that of a common rifle chambered in .243 Winchester. Less physical punishment makes for a more enjoyable afternoon at the range, and can result in tighter groups.

So what do all the numbers mean? Not much if you enjoy what you're shooting. I am one who dissects things like the above down to the ridiculous, just because I am curious about many things mathematical and I am somewhat of a "student" of the shooting sports. I'd love to get down to Vegas where you shoot and stretch the legs of my rifle, just to see what it (and I) can do at such long ranges. We have many places up north, here, but there is always the risk of some punk coming along on a motorcycle and stealing the target, trashing the target or moronically occupying the line of fire just to make trouble for us with the rifles. These kids today know nothing of respect for others. I was taught respect for others at home and during my grade school years in the 1960s. Sadly, the teaching of "self-esteem" has replaced the teaching of respect for others, of responsibility for your own actions and of the ability to discern right from wrong...
I’m going to have to completely 100% agree with you on that. In today’s society no one knows respect, hell half of them can’t even respect themselves.
 

11Charlie

Staff Member
Messages
793
Reactions
933
I'm loving this! Following because I would love to know where your at after you have the opportunity to shoot it through the crono.
 
OP
Glockenstien
Messages
33
Reactions
20
Well I took six rifles and and five pistols. Get to my shooting spot and plug the crono in and the battiers were dead and I forgot to grab extra batteries. So I don’t have any info now sorry. I have to reload all the brass and get some more once fired brass. And I also have to reload more 300 jarret ammo. Man it takes a lot of powder for those rounds.
 
Messages
726
Reactions
552
Get to my shooting spot, plug the chrono in and the batteries were dead. I forgot to grab extra batteries. And I have to reload more 300 Jarrett ammo. Man, it takes a lot of powder for those rounds.
I keep several spare Energizers in my range box; they are known to keep their charge over a long, long time. My 30-caliber mildcat round propels a 180-grain Sierra MatchKing bullet to 3000 fps with 68.0 grains of H-4831SC. The rifle weighs nineteen pounds, so the recoil is very mild. The .300 Jarret kicks that bullet up to 3200-something. Is that extra speed (which neither you nor the bull elk can appreciate) worth the kick in the head that's every firing of that rifle? Not for me. I've never been one to take pride or pleasure in telling others that my speeding bullet is faster than Superman. What matters in shooting is accuracy. If a rifle is not accurate, of what value is there in talking about it?
 

UPCOMING EVENTS

Crossroads of the West Gun Show
Centennial Hall
263 N Center St, Mesa, AZ 85201, USA
Crossroads of the West Gun Show
The Icehouse
429 W Jackson St, Phoenix, AZ 85003, USA
2019 Gun Rights Policy Conference
Sheraton Crescent Hotel
2620 W Dunlap Ave, Phoenix, AZ 85021, USA

LATEST REVIEWS

  • American Guns & Ammo
    5.00 star(s)
    This is a great place to shop. The staff is friendly and they will treat you right. Al (the...
    • 1971Chevelle
  • Sportsman's Warehouse - Tucson
    5.00 star(s)
    I bought a Win M70 Safari Express here 2 years ago after an uphill search online The lady who...
    • MichaelTQS
  • Northwest Arms
    5.00 star(s)
    This is my local gun store of choice , family owned and operated , friendly and knowledgeable...
    • JOE TRUMP
  • Glock 38
    4.00 star(s)
    This is a great little gun, often sold at a discount due to lack of popularity, a handloader's...
    • Cliph
  • Glock 19
    4.00 star(s)
    Likely the most popular handgun in the world and an excellent combat pistol.
    • Cliph