The best portable stove for your Bug out bag...period!

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More stove, less stew...

Also, the really nice ultralight backpack stoves are made of aluminum.. usually kitty food cans, I have one that I set inside my ESBIT stove that holds the pot up. I see how that stove was made thois ugh, I've been thinking about turning some of my substantial talents over to making a few nice stoves out of titanium sheet metal I have.

Interesting cast aluminum is probably the worst way to make that stove, it looks like it's probably spun, and made on a can forming machine. (which is kinda like a punch press, but different)
 
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Just some thoughts here.
If a bug out bag is ever needed, it better be what you can carry on your back, because the liklihood of getting anywhere in a vehicle is going to be slim to none in any populated area. There will be mayhem in Evey direction for the first month. You will most likely spend 80 percent of your time finding food water and evading others that would take what you have. Good weapon(s) all the ammo and mags you can carry a couple good knives, a multi tool some paracord, wire, mono line, a container to carry water and ability to purify or filter it, knowledge of everything you can eat that wont kill you and the things above that according to your ability to carry and use. Unless you have lived with those few things for a week or two and learned ahead of time, I am afraid survivability is going to he questionable.
Your biggest threat will be yourself and those that would kill you for what you have. Trust in others better begin at 0 and grow by the prove it method.
Once you have the skills to believe you might make it, say your prayers you dont ever have to put it all to practice.
Counting on a vehicle to get you out of an area like LA, Portland, Seattle or any urban areas probably is a mythical dream. Roads will all be gridlocked or closed by roadblocks and the farther you are from them the better.
 
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Sorry about rambling on like that, but have a couple friends that had just built their bug out kits and it would have taken a truck and trailer to carry it all. I see many that do the same, and expend a lot of money to prep beyond reality.
Look at the roads on a friday night before a 3 day weekend. Then think about if it were a situation where everyone hit the road at once.
Not a situation to be caught in.
 
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Wow! How complicated! Take a #10 can and cut the top and bottom out. Next, cut a small square panel out of the side at one end, being sure not to cut through the crimped area at the cans rim. This is to insure rigidity and stability. This is now the stoves bottom and the cutout is the wood feed. Now, using a church key punch a number of holes evenly around the side of the can on the oposite end. This is the top of the stove. I use an old aluminum cooking pot that balances perfectly upon the stove (it's very stable). I've used the same rig for around 35 years! It's fed with twigs and finger sized peices of wood and I carry a folding bypass pruner (visualize a Leatherman tool for gardeners) to process wood. It's very light and compact by the way, as is the stove and pot. Some folks save the cutout from the side of the can as a damper. It's unnecessary in my opinion. Lots of heat, very fast! Insulation? Don't touch the darned thing when its hot!

By the way. Some people use tent pegs through the vent holes on top to set smaller pots on.
 
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Well, that's a nice looking rig! Flat really is not important to me. I stuff the stove and pot with food, clean up items, etc. also I can feed it without removing the pot.

I liked your images. Especially the one showing how to set up the stove by removing a turve of sod so it's traces are completely hidden!

Oh yeah! Mine's free!
 
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Just remember, the wolf can smell its prey from 20 miles away.
Some humans can also smell things from a long ways.
Anytime you cook anything, use your head and think who will be attracted and
are they a threat to you and yours. Use cooking only to treat things that may have parasitic organisms.
Or in a completely threat free environment.
Learn to eat raw, which most things can be.
Anything is fine for a camping trip or backpacking trip, but in a serious
survival shtf situation, save your room for ammo (keep front and center) and essentials needed to survive.
It won't be a comfort trip then.
Hydrate often, eat when its safe. If you have water, you can survive a long time on small amounts of food.
Happy hour is when you can wake up the next morning.
 
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Just remember, the wolf can smell its prey from 20 miles away.
Some humans can also smell things from a long ways.
Anytime you cook anything, use your head and think who will be attracted and
are they a threat to you and yours. Use cooking only to treat things that may have parasitic organisms.
Or in a completely threat free environment.
Learn to eat raw, which most things can be.
Anything is fine for a camping trip or backpacking trip, but in a serious
survival shtf situation, save your room for ammo and essentials needed to survive.
It won't be a comfort trip then.
I agree. I would think that if you have to cook it would be wise to choose your ground and set ambush first. Snares or trot lines could be a red flag to people you do not want to meet!
 
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I've done a lot of back packing, the weight of the pack is critical especialy if your feet are not conditioned to hiking w/a pack. Recently I was on a 125 mile trek, weight was critical. I packed esbit tabs, a small kettle, plastic bowl and commuter mug with lid plus a plastic spoon. My stove was any 3 rocks that would support the small kettle. 3 esbit tabs would boil enough water for food and coffee. Esbits will burn when wet, burn to ash and produce no smoke.
 
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One of the big differences between a camp-out and a bug-out is NO FIRE and if you have kids/wife and the like living W/O a fire and the morale boost it provides can be a big bummer to those not used to that life, especially in winter!
On the other hand it frees you from building the fire and feeding it 24-7 which, of course, is a huge Fail on so many levels.
For a single adult male w/right gear, living like a LRP is an inconvenience .
For a family it can cause a break-down which is why most families stay in place until the treat is danger close (Balkans). I expect to see the same, especially after Obama has his way w/the middle class.
Esbit tabs have their place in every BOB but eventually we will all need to build a stove that will maximize local fuels if only to cook local foods.
 
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Jet boil......compact, heats incredibly fast, a canister lasts a long time and durable. Able to boil water almost instantly to get rid of bugs. Can cook meat in water in minutes when cubed. Stays lit even in the nastiest rain and wind. If I was stuck in the jungle I would want this with me.
 

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